• Newsletters
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
°
Wednesday, September 20, 2017
View complete forecast
News-Sentinel.com Your Town. Your Voice.

Tony Dungy inspires dreams

Elmhurst freshmen, from left, Quindall Hernandez, Ronald Lucas, Tim Charles, Ricky Scott and Brian Tate got to shake hands with former Indianapolis Colts football coach Tony Dungy after his speech Wednesday morning at North Side High School.
Elmhurst freshmen, from left, Quindall Hernandez, Ronald Lucas, Tim Charles, Ricky Scott and Brian Tate got to shake hands with former Indianapolis Colts football coach Tony Dungy after his speech Wednesday morning at North Side High School.
Copyright 2014 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.The Associated Press

Former Colts coach motivates FWCS freshmen in talk

Thursday, February 05, 2009 10:01 am
Tony Dungy walked into the North Side High School gym Wednesday not as the former coach of the Indianapolis Colts, but as a man on a mission to help a younger generation. A 25-minute talk with the students was enough to catch the attention of more than just a few of the bright-eyed listeners.“He influenced me more, influenced me to keep my head on (straight),” said Ricky Scott, 15.

Dungy came to speak to all Fort Wayne Community Schools freshmen Wednesday during two sessions to promote his newest book, “Uncommon: Finding Your Path to Significance,” and also to encourage these young adults that “you can achieve.”

After retirement last month from the NFL team, Dungy set out on a new mission, especially after the overwhelming success of his first book, “Quiet Strength.”

“That was the first time I saw the impact that I could have,” he said after talking to students from Elmhurst, Snider and Wayne high schools Wednesday morning.

He said awareness that he could make a difference was the catalyst for writing the second book, which aims to help young men by showing them that nontraditional backgrounds and transitioning from different roles don't have to be hindrances. It was a book he was happy to write. “They had to kind of talk me into writing the first (book),” he said.

Uncommon success was the center of his talk to students Wednesday, using examples such as Rod Woodson, a Snider grad who was recently named to the Pro Football Hall of Fame, or Hillary Clinton, who didn't see being a woman as a barrier to her dreams in politics.

“It's not what you do but how you do it. That's not necessarily a lesson we tell you at this age,” Dungy told the students. “You can achieve it if you're willing to work and step out of the crowd a bit.”

After his talk, students surprisingly weren't talking about Dungy's win record or the football stars he's shaped. They were talking about their own dreams and the newfound hope they had in achieving them.

“If we do good, good things will happen,” said Ronald Lucas.

Comments

News-Sentinel.com reserves the right to remove any content appearing on its website. Our policy will be to remove postings that constitute profanity, obscenity, libel, spam, invasion of privacy, impersonation of another, or attacks on racial, ethnic or other groups. For more information, see our user rules page.
comments powered by Disqus