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Letters to the editor

Thursday, September 27, 2012 - 12:01 am

Jobs didn't build that

“You didn’t build that” was Barack Obama’s retort to the idea that businesses were built completely by entrepreneurs. Conservative media blowhards immediately pounced on Obama. This was just more proof, they said, that Obama was a closet commie maliciously seething to destroy Mom, flag and apple pie.

However, if one looks at Apple, one sees that Obama is right.

Steve Jobs arrived in Silicon Valley when companies like HP and Intel, critical to Apple’s success, were already there. Apple’s first PCs were dependent on computer chips that were impossible without the development of integrated circuit fabrication technology. Much of this technology was stimulated by national investment in NASA in the 1960s. Jobs contributed zero to the building of these companies and the development of IC technology.

Wireless technology had been developed for at least 20 years before Apple sold their first smart phone. To utilize wireless technology, Apple purchased IEEE publications about wireless technology, spending about $1,000 and got the technology this way. Jobs contributed zero to the development of wireless technology.

The iPhone transmits via the wireless infrastructure through the national telecom infrastructure. Because of the enormous amount of data transmitted by the iPhone, many of the connections from the cell network base stations to the telephony infrastructure are special fiber optic links that were made possible by high linearity lasers invented for CATV transmission in the 1990s. The data, when received at telecom central offices, is then transmitted by completely different high capacity fiber optic links that were invented starting in the 1980s. Jobs contributed zero to the development of fiber optic technology.

It is beyond question that Jobs goes down in history next to Thomas Edison. But Jobs didn’t build that. Jobs’ success was dependent on the American technological legacy that he did not develop.

Maybe people like Jobs, who gained so much from the national technology legacy, can afford to pay some more in taxes. Maybe they could look at it as a way to say, “Thank God I’m an American.”

Hank Achor

Disney training here

In April, I was offered the opportunity to attend training provided by the Disney Institute on Quality Service sponsored by Ivy Tech Corporate College in Fort Wayne. I was excited to attend this training because of the renowned Disney name. It was apparent from the training that Disney provides unparalleled customer service and creates a positive, uplifting culture for their employees and guests.

The course on quality service taught me the importance of determining customers’ wants and needs and showed ways to accomplish that. They provided a matrix that shows how to better serve clients by considering quality standards and delivery system. Overall, the training was delivered in a fun and easy-to-understand manner.

This fall, Disney Institute is coming back and will be presenting their Building Healthcare Excellence program. The training is scheduled for Wednesday, Oct. 24, at Holiday Inn Fort Wayne. More information can be found at IvyTech.edu/DisneyInstitute or by calling 480-4118. Employees from our organization (Aging & In-Home Services of Northeast Indiana) will be attending, and I would strongly encourage attendance if you have any connection to the health care industry. I know from experience it will provide valuable, world-class training for all.

Chris Forcucci, R.N., senior vice president, Integrated Services and Research

Aging & In-Home Services of Northeast Indiana