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Letters to the editor

Thursday, November 22, 2012 - 12:01 am

Boosting biodiesel production good policy for creating jobs

The Obama administration should be commended for supporting strong domestic energy policy by boosting biodiesel production last month under the Renewable Fuel Standard.

This decision will stimulate new biodiesel production and create jobs across the country, including right here in Indiana where the world’s largest integrated soy biodiesel plant is located.

Biodiesel — made from feedstocks such as soybean oil, recycled cooking oil and animal fats — is the first and only EPA-designated advanced biofuel to be produced on a commercial scale nationwide. Biodiesel isn’t just a good thing for soybean farmers, but also for livestock farmers and ultimately consumers.

Livestock, especially pigs and poultry, rely on soybean meal for a large portion of the protein in their diet. When soybean oil is used for biodiesel, this increases oil value and can create a steady supply of soybean meal for livestock farmers.

The administration’s decision increases the amount of biodiesel that refiners must use to displace petroleum diesel next year to a total of 1.28 billion gallons. The U.S. diesel market equals about 55 billion gallons annually. This gives the biodiesel industry and its feedstock producers the certainty they need to boost production and invest in their operations.

It also will diversify our fuel supplies so that we’re not so dependent on global petroleum prices that threaten our national security and economic growth. With gas prices once again on the rise, this is exactly the kind of smart domestic energy policy we need for the future.

Kevin Wilson, president, Indiana Soybean Alliance

Walton

Mother aware of abuse should also be guilty

I read the article “No jail time for mother aware of abuse” on Oct. 30. 1. I feel the mother was just as guilty as her boyfriend, especially her knowing that her children were being abused. 2. I feel a mother who loves her children would not put her children in harm’s way to be abused. 3. What child would like growing up and remembering that their parent let them be abused?

Be it mother and boyfriend, they both were guilty of a heinous crime.

If the judge were a child, how would he feel being abused? Ever try and put the shoe on the other foot? If the judge would have put her in prison, she soon would have realized that she was being punished for a wrongdoing. It would have taught her that you do not get by with child abuse.

I totally agree with Virginia Reiter on this issue. The lawyers will tell you that the judge can and will do what they want as they have the power to do this while they are in office.

Thank God! I have the power at election time to vote for the judge that I feel will protect children from parents that know that their children are being abused. I have the right to vote, and I and many of my friends agree with me on this issue. Some people go to prison for this, and some do not.

Funny how the law applies to certain people. More people need to let the judges know how we feel.

Joan Busche

Grabill

P.S. Ever see the lady holding the scales in the court house on mural? Sometimes scales seem lopsided.

Unhappy customer

On Sept. 3 I attempted to contact City Utilities, first by telephone than through email, that my recycling bin had not been picked up on the designated day. I received no response. Four weeks later on Sept. 29 I requested a credit for missed service. Today, Oct. 19, I received an email response from Waste Management manager Matt Gratz that on Sept. 29 City Utilities forwarded my email to his assistant regarding my request for a credit. Apparently his assistant was on vacation for three weeks, and no one was answering her emails in her absence.

According to Waste Management, someone attempted to empty my recycling bin three days after my complaint. However, I was not notified of this and had pulled my recycling cart back up to my house.

It took six weeks from the time of my initial complaint to get a response from someone. I still have not heard from anyone at City Utilities. Mr. Gratz was supposed to inquire as to why it took the city so long to contact him and I have not heard back from him yet. That was two weeks ago.

Laura J. Smyser