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COMMUNITY VOICE

Religion is the basis for where and how life began -- and continues

Thursday, January 31, 2013 - 12:01 am

This column is in response to the editorial in your News-Sentinel dated Dec. 6 titled “Still trying to sneak religion in.” Said article states in part, “This is one more attempt to force a religious debate into science classrooms.”

Thank God, literally, that I went to public school in a day when it was entirely acceptable (maybe even required) to teach biblical truths and even memorize Bible passages. There is a seeming paradox in the minds of many today between “religious” precepts and science. As one who has been steeped in both I would like to state my views as I have in the past in this publication and others.

To lend credence to my views I need to humbly submit my education and experience in regard to science and religion: a Christian church member since age 4 and student of the Holy Scriptures for 42 years, a fighter pilot during the Korean War, a B.S. degree in aeronautical engineering, several years working in the aerospace industry, including design, and building Redstone and Jupiter boosters (missiles) used in the launching of space exploration vehicles in the 1950s and 1960s. Notwithstanding all of that, I find no inconsistency between biblical teachings and science. Science by definition can be proved.

The subject article states that “the U.S. Supreme Court ruled in 1987 that teaching creation science in public school is unconstitutional if the purpose is to advance a particular religion.” The concept of creation of the world is certainly not believed only by “a particular religion” (Christianity), therefore teaching it in public schools should be acceptable to the Supreme Court.

We Christians often take the easy road on issues like this so as not to offend anyone (unfortunately). My scientific education, experience and work only lend credence to my religious beliefs. I have not blindly accepted religious teachings, but have studied evolutionary theory (yes, theory) in some depth and find endless scientific holes; an obvious and very simple example is that we evolved from one-celled protoplasm. If anyone can believe that, then I have some oceanfront property for sale in Indiana. Think about it: A blob in the sea, or primordial swamp, evolved into something more advanced simply because it wanted to or was tired of being a one-celled protoplasm lying in the swamp? And not to mention, where did the one-celled protoplasm come from? Well, some have speculated, according to at least one scientific author, that it may have come from outer space, but he neglected to explain the origin of such a creature.

Am I oblivious to evolution? No. Many life forms evolve, but within their kind; humans have evolved from short stooped, flat-headed beings to what we are today; they all had/have one head, two arms and legs, etc. None of the books I have read on the subject of evolution describe how species evolved into different species — they just say that they did.

Species die off for various reasons, dinosaurs for example, but there is no credible scientific evidence that species turn into other species. There have been several such claims over the years made by wannabe famous “scientists,” all since proved to be false. But the skeptics live on and always will. For those who say that I am not a scientist so what do I know, I would suggest they read a little book titled “The Collapse of Evolution” by Scott M. Huse, Ph.D., a scientist at the U.S. Air Force’s Rome Laboratory.

Two other books I would recommend are “Christian Scholar’s Review,” a compilation of articles written by several Christian authors, and “Cosmos, Bios, Theos,” another compilation, but this one written by several scientists.

If one prefers listening over reading, there is a six-tape audio set titled “Something from Nothing” done by Dr. James Kennedy. I have several other such books on my shelf, and there are more in libraries and of course Christian, and some other, bookstores.

Back to the title of The News-Sentinel article, which states religion is not to be “sneaked in.” That is a problem in today’s society. But religion cannot be left out of everyday life; it is where and how life began and continues.

Richard B. Doner is a resident of Fort Wayne.