News-Sentinel.com Your Town. Your Voice.
Local Business Search
Stock Summary
Dow16981.32-1.27
Nasdaq4451.166.25
S&P 5001976.94-1.97
AEP54.37-0.28
Comcast55.690.96
GE25.56-0.03
ITT Exelis17.005-0.085
LNC52.495-0.405
Navistar36.850.08
Raytheon92.80-0.48
SDI21.565-0.105
Verizon52.35990.7799
SENSE & SENSITIVITY, A COLUMN BY HARRIETTE COLE

Set up ground rules for co-worker

Friday, February 15, 2013 - 7:56 am

Q.: I went to a meeting with a colleague the other day where I was supposed to make a presentation to our client. My colleague was supposed to be there as an observer and to help answer any questions.

As it turned out, he jumped in before I even got started and basically stole my presentation. I could hardly get a word in edgewise. I was so angry. How should I handle this? The client was pleased and we got the business, but my co-worker overstepped his bounds. – Irked, Washington, D.C.

A.: Ask your colleague directly why he chose to overstep the boundaries of your meeting and jump in the way he did. Tell him that although of course you are glad the business was secured, you do not appreciate the way he handled it. Get him to talk about his motive.

Perhaps he wanted to prove that he can pitch. He may have felt that you were moving too slowly in the beginning. He also may have intended to usurp your position. You won't know until you talk to him about it.

Include in your conversation a recommendation for how you can work together moving forward. Because the deal was secured, you may want to keep him around even if he did annoy you. Suggest that you divide up duties so both of you will have important roles in meetings, since clearly he does not want to be an observer. But it is important to establish ground rules for how you can best work together.

Lifestylist and author Harriette Cole is president and creative director of Harriette Cole Media. You can send questions to askharriette@harriettecole.com or C/O Universal Uclick, 1130 Walnut St., Kansas City, MO 64106.