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News-Sentinel.com Your Town. Your Voice.

Historic neighborhood, State Blvd. section on Indiana Landmarks' Endangered List

City Councilman John Shoaff, right, talks with a constituent about the State Boulevard widening project in February during an open house on the project. (News-Sentinel file photo)
City Councilman John Shoaff, right, talks with a constituent about the State Boulevard widening project in February during an open house on the project. (News-Sentinel file photo)
Copyright 2014 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.The Associated Press
Thursday, April 25, 2013 10:12 am
The Brookview-Irvington Park Historic District on Fort Wayne's near north side and the section of State Boulevard that winds through it have been listed on Indiana Landmarks' 10 Most Endangered list.The historic preservation organization annually issues a Top 10 list of Hoosier landmarks in jeopardy of being lost. Sites on the list "are significant and irreplaceable — and often challenging to save," the organization said in a news release issued Thursday.

“These landmarks preserve connections to our shared heritage, and restoring them can spur broader revitalization,” Marsh Davis, Indiana Landmarks' president, said in the news release.

The organization uses the Most Endangered list to call attention to sites in danger of being lost and to encourage solutions that preserve them, the news release said.

The Brookview-Irvington Park neighborhoods and State Boulevard are the only Fort Wayne-area sites on the Most Endangered list.

City officials have proposed straightening and widening State to four lanes between Clinton and Cass streets. The project also would try to reduce flooding problems there by making the bridge over Spy Run Creek several feet higher than it is now and by removing homes in the low-lying area of the neighborhoods.

Some residents oppose the project because they believe it would damage the historic character of the neighborhoods, lower property values and possibly increase truck traffic.

The Brookview neighborhood was designed in 1917 by Arthur Shurcliff, whose other projects included the restoration of Colonial Williamsburg. Shurcliff intended for streets in neighborhood to be curvy, which slows traffic and allows people to enjoy the scenic view.

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