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Dozen-plus Fort Wayne residents evacuated after fire, gas leak on Huffman Street

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Tuesday, May 7, 2013 - 12:31 pm

A total of 16 people were evacuated from homes in the area of Huffman Street and Sherman Boulevard on Tuesday morning after Fort Wayne firefighters discovered that a fire at that intersection was being fed by a natural gas leak.

The fire, reported at 5:23 a.m., was in a structure that housed Meyer Creek Antiques, 901 Huffman St., and apartment units. A family of six - four adults and two children – was evacuated from that building, Fort Wayne Fire Department spokeswoman Stacey Fleming said Tuesday morning.

When firefighters found that the fire was being fed at least in part by a natural gas leak, they contacted NIPSCO. On the utility's advice, she said, they evacuated 10 more people from nearby homes. The 16 evacuees are being helped by the American Red Cross, she said. While extinguishing the blaze, there was a small explosion forcing firefighters from the structure until gas could be turned off.

Fleming said NIPSCO cut off gas to the structure, but firefighters at 9 a.m. were continuing to fight it defensively; that is, they were not going into the two-story building, but fighting the fire from outside.

Fire investigators were at the scene early Tuesday afternoon after the building had been torn down.

Stretches of Huffman and Sherman were blocked to traffic. At about 9:30 a.m., flames were still breaking out in parts of the building, even as part of the rear of the structure was being torn down to open up the interior for streams of water.

Editor's note: Video courtesy of Loretta Barlow