News-Sentinel.com Your Town. Your Voice.
This Weeks Deal
Basche's Martial Arts
Buy 1 Admission for Women's Self Defense Clinic for $20, and bring a friend for free
This Week Only
$20
50% off
Local Business Search
Stock Summary
Dow17113.540
Nasdaq4456.020
S&P 5001983.539.9
AEP54.050
Comcast54.630
GE26.020
ITT Exelis17.860
LNC52.850
Navistar37.830
Raytheon96.860
SDI21.690
Verizon50.980

Letter to the editor: Community-oriented policing does work

Wednesday, May 8, 2013 - 12:01 am

Our community has been shaken recently by the many homicides and police shootings. As usual, everyone involved is being tried and convicted by the media and public, even before investigations have been completed. All of those involved were or are loved by many. If you support a police officer or an alleged perpetrator, then by all means, share the positive side of their lives with everyone but don’t throw unfounded accusations around about an incident that is still under investigation.

There is always going to be a “front page splash” if a police officer is involved in a notable action, but there is minimal coverage on positive actions unless the public shouts about it. This is the perfect time to request that from this day forward, if you feel a specific officer has gone beyond their regular job description, to help you or someone else, find out their name and let their quadrant commander or sergeant know about it by email or phone. We need the positive notations of their career entered into their file as well as the disciplinary ones.

Many officers will give you their card with a cellphone number to call them if you want to share info or need their help. The officers who work your district are the ones who respond to your 911 call for help. If you have been sharing info with them, they will know exactly where the location is and maybe who is involved. When an officer drives down the street, the bad guys see them before they are seen. If he/she knows where to focus their attention (because of your info), they can observe them first and maybe prevent a crime or arrest a fugitive. Share info with the officers in your area. Once you let them in, they become part of your neighborhood, too, and will work with you to get rid of the bad guys. It’s called community-oriented policing, but it is not one-sided; it takes the citizens and police, working together, to make it happen. We know it firsthand. It worked with our neighborhood and continues today.

The Vandeveer Family>/i>