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News-Sentinel.com Your Town. Your Voice.

Housing complex on Fairfield Avenue on schedule for June 2014 debut

The Courtyard, a 36-unit housing complex that will primarily serve youths who have aged out of foster care, is scheduled to open in June 2014. (Photo by Elbert Starks III of The News-Sentinel)
The Courtyard, a 36-unit housing complex that will primarily serve youths who have aged out of foster care, is scheduled to open in June 2014. (Photo by Elbert Starks III of The News-Sentinel)
Copyright 2014 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.The Associated Press
Friday, October 25, 2013 05:56 am
The Courtyard - a 36-unit housing complex being built at the site of the former Duemling Clinic on Fairfield Avenue — is on schedule for its debut in June 2014.According to developer Kevan Biggs of Biggs Property Management, the Courtyard will have its trusses set next week and should have a roof put on shortly afterward, allowing workers protection from the elements as fall and winter weather is in sight.

The Courtyard is the first of its kind in Indiana, Biggs said: It will primarily serve youths who have aged-out of foster care. Those youths have been identified as being particularly susceptible to being homeless — some within 18 months of being out on their own for the first time — due to the sometimes transitory nature of their younger years.

The housing complex, which will have one, two and three-bedroom units, is being built with an eye toward changing that. It will feature a "training kitchen" where residents will be taught how to prepare food and cook for themselves, while some job preparation and job readiness training will also be held.

There will be an on-site property manager who lives in the Courtyard in a 37th unit, which will also allow residents a consistent resource to draw upon. An "urban garden" is also being planned for a currently vacant piece of property that is owned by the development, so residents can grow their own food and possibly develop entrepreneurial skills by selling the produce to farmers' markets.

"It's been exciting. This has received resounding support in the community," Biggs said. "It has really just coalesced into a remarkable project."

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