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Fort Wayne native has small role in new Vince Vaughn film 'Delivery Man'

More Information

Special 'Delivery'

What: Fort Wayne native Michael Oberholtzer has a small role in the new comedy film “Delivery Man,” which stars Vince Vaughn and opens Thursday at local theaters.

Information: For more about the film, go to www.dreamworksstudios.com/films/delivery-man or on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/DeliveryManMovie.

The comedy opens Thursday at local movie theaters

Tuesday, November 19, 2013 - 12:01 am

When the Vince Vaughn comedy film “Delivery Man” arrives in local movie theaters Thursday, it will have a little local flavor.

Fort Wayne native and Bishop Luers High School graduate Michael Oberholtzer has a small part in the film as one of 533 “children” born using fertility center sperm donations that Vaughn's character made 20 years earlier.

While Oberholtzer hasn't gotten a lot of time in front of the camera yet, he's working at what he loves. He's also soaking up all the knowledge he can.

“Being on set, for me, is what I live for,” he said during a telephone interview from New York City, where he lives. “There is so much to learn. The people you get to work with know so much.”

In “Delivery Man,” Oberholtzer plays Kyle Walters, a grocery store bagger who is one of 142 young adults who join a class-action lawsuit seeking to learn the identity of the donor whose sperm helped create them.

Vaughn's character, friendly underachiever David Wozniak, owes money to the mob and has just been dumped by his pregnant girlfriend, a movie plot summary says. As the film plays out, Wozniak discovers more about himself and the father he could become.

Oberholtzer got his first look at the final cut of the film during a screening this weekend in New York.

“Some of my stuff was cut (which I anticipated), but I'm all over the movie and I am happy with the final product,” he said Monday via email.

“Two producers and the director (Ken Scott) came up to me last night and told me I did a good job,” he added. “Vince said I should be proud. Everyone is happy, and it's been screening very well.”

Working with Vaughn was great, Oberholtzer said, adding that Vaughn was “very professional.”

They did some improvisation together during filming, Oberholtzer said, and Vaughn later told him he liked his work. Oberholtzer also learned a lot from watching Vaughn work on the set and how he handled improvisation.

Oberholtzer auditioned for a role in the movie last year and learned in late September or early October 2012 he had a part. Filming took place from October through December 2012 in New York City.

Oberholtzer always has had an interest in performing.

In middle school, he acted in plays and sang at school and at his church, he said. He and a friend even filmed their own “TV show” in their basements, though it never was broadcast anywhere.

After two years at another Fort Wayne high school, Oberholtzer transferred to Bishop Luers in 1999, he said. He jumped right into acting in plays and musicals, and also sang in the choir and show choir.

After graduating in 2001, he studied filmmaking at Columbia College in Chicago and did some acting in the Windy City. After college, he moved in 2005 to New York to pursue his dream of working as an actor.

Oberholtzer described the thrill he gets from acting as “kind of like jumping off a cliff. ... It is a rush, man. It's fun.”

He's open to doing films, theater, TV and music videos.

This summer, he played a person in the crowd during a party scene for musician-actor Justin Timberlake's music video for the song “Take Back the Night.” Oberholtzer also had a small part in a Bud Light commercial starring Timberlake that was filmed the same day.

He also has small parts in the upcoming Showtime film “Trending Down” and in the upcoming movie “Hits.”

What he learns performing in small roles will help him land larger roles in the future, he said.

“I always kind of wanted to make movies and stuff, but, for must of us, it seems like a far-fetched dream,” he said.

He's working hard to make the dream a reality.