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Letter to the editor: Remembering Acme Bar before 1941

Monday, April 7, 2014 - 8:48 am

I read in an article that the Acme Bar has been a neighborhood place since 1941. This is not correct; I was in the Acme with my father in late 1937.

We went there looking for my Uncle Pat. A man named Willett operated the Acme at that time. My father died June 10, 1938. He was buried in the Catholic cemetery.

On the way back from the cemetery my cousin Mary Ley was driving my father’s car. We were heading west on State Street when she looked in the rearview mirror and started to laugh saying, “I knew it.”

I looked out the rear window and saw Uncle Pat, Ray Junk and some other pallbearers going into the Acme. At that time it was the closest bar to the Catholic cemetery.

In the fall of 1938 my mother took me to see Dr. Harry Harvey. His office was on the southeast corner of State and Crescent. After leaving the doctor’s mom said, “Let’s see if Uncle Pat’s home.”

We went across the street and down a few doors to the Acme. Uncle Pat was on a bar stool, and Willett and Wilbur DeCamp were behind the bar. During the day Mr. DeCamp was janitor-caretaker at St. Paul’s Catholic where I went to school. Willett owned the Acme until he opened the 1030 Club on Maumee. He sold the Acme to Stavretti.

He later sold the 1030 Club to Sam Talarico and opened an appliance store. I was told the Acme opened after the repeal of prohibition, but by whom I don’t know.

Paul Haughan