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THE LAST WORD

Woman who sold 35,000 abortions speaks to pro-lifers

Saturday, April 26, 2014 - 12:01 am

A woman who spent six years leading four abortion clinics in Texas that accounted for 35,000 abortions spoke before hundreds of pro-lifers this week at Memorial Coliseum.

They didn’t throw tomatoes at her. They didn’t even boo her.

The crowd was silent as she recounted the story of her life as an abortion provider and her passion for making money at the expense of each baby and its mother.

What made her welcome before that group was her 180-degree turn in 1983 to a new life helping “set girls and women free from abortion by connecting them with positive, life-affirming options.”

Carol Everett was the featured speaker Tuesday at the 29th annual A Hope Center fundraising banquet . A Hope Center is a local agency with four locations in Allen County that provides free, confidential pregnancy testing, ultrasounds, counseling for women and men, community referrals and post-abortion services.

Everett’s gripping story began when she became pregnant as an unmarried 16-year-old before abortion was legal, then got married and had another baby. She was divorced, then married another man who demanded she have an abortion when she got pregnant in 1973, shortly after the landmark Roe v. Wade decision by the Supreme Court.

After that, Everett said, she had an affair, started drinking and left her husband. She eventually got a job with an abortionist, which showed her how much money can be made in the abortion business. So she decided to open her own clinics and started to watch the money roll in.

“My main goal was to sell abortions,” she declared. So it should be no surprise that an unwed, pregnant girl not knowing what to do and calling an abortion clinic would not be offered the option of keeping the baby or giving the baby up for adoption.

“I planned to be a millionaire,” she said of the latter stages of her career in the abortion industry. Abortions averaged $600 each in cost, and her share was adding up exponentially.

But she said she gave her life to Christ, and suddenly her perspective abruptly changed and she realized she had been seeking affirmation of her own abortion through the acceptance of so many of her customers in having it done to them.

Suddenly, she said, she was counseling women to seek alternatives. She went on to educate the pro-life movement about the day-to-day activities within the abortion industry and founded The Heidi Group, which “works with a network of life-affirming nonprofits across the nation offering expertise in media, fundraising and strategic planning.”

Everett said she was glad to hear Fort Wayne no longer has an active abortion clinic. In Texas, she said, the number of abortion clinics continues to go down because of changes in state law.

“I think the end (of legalized abortions) is near,” she told the crowd, “and we as Christians must have the courage to stand up and do what God has called us to do.”

Kerry Hubartt is editor of The News-Sentinel.