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Fever center to have season-ending surgery in June

Copyright 2014 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed. The Associated Press
Friday, June 21, 2013 - 6:10 pm

INDIANAPOLIS — The injury-depleted Indiana Fever received more bad news Friday when center Jessica Davenport was lost for the season.

Davenport has not played this season because of a stress fracture in her lower left leg. She will have season-ending surgery before the end of June.

The defending WNBA champs have started 1-5 after losing Davenport, guard Katie Douglas with a bulging disc in her lower back, guard Erin Phillips with a torn right meniscus and guard Jeanette Pohlen with a torn left anterior cruciate ligament. Those four players combined for 60 starts during the regular season and playoffs in Indiana's title-winning season.

To replace Davenport, the Fever have signed Jasmine Hassell as a replacement player.

AP-WF-06-21-13 1958GMT

Dykstra freed from California prison

LOS ANGELES — Former All-Star outfielder Lenny Dykstra has been released from a California prison after serving time for bankruptcy fraud.

Dykstra, 50, who had a 12-year career with the New York Mets and Philadelphia Phillies, was freed, according to federal Bureau of Prisons records, but no other details were available. A message left for his attorney Christopher Dybwad was not immediately returned Friday.

Dykstra was sentenced in December to 6 1/2 months in prison for hiding baseball gloves and other heirlooms from his playing days that were supposed to be part of his bankruptcy filing. He already had served seven months in custody awaiting sentencing.

The prison term ran concurrently with a three-year sentence for pleading no contest to grand theft auto and providing a false financial statement.

Dykstra, who bought a mansion once owned by hockey star Wayne Gretzky, filed for bankruptcy four years ago, claiming he owed more than $31 million and had only $50,000 in assets.

After the filing, Dykstra hid, sold or destroyed at least $200,000 worth of items without the permission of a bankruptcy trustee, prosecutors said.

He pleaded guilty last summer to one count each of bankruptcy fraud, concealment of assets and money laundering.

Dykstra is now on three years' probation and must complete 500 hours of community service, participate in a substance abuse treatment program and pay $200,000 in restitution.

Ruff hired by Dallas

DALLAS — Lindy Ruff had one stipulation when he agreed to meet with the Dallas Stars about their coaching vacancy.

“We can’t meet in the crease,” Ruff said about his joking conversation with new Stars General Manager Jim Nill.

Ruff was hired Friday the new coach of the Stars, 14 years after Dallas clinched its only Stanley Cup championship on a goal he has always questioned — Brett Hull’s shot with his skate in the crease late in the third overtime of Game 6 that beat the Ruff-coached Buffalo Sabres.

“It’s a long time ago,” Ruff said after his introduction. “I’ve had some great memories. I’ve gotten past that. I’m a coach, I want to coach, and this is an unbelievable opportunity. ... It all worked out great for Dallas.

“It didn’t work out so good for us back then. I can tell you one thing, that same emotion and same passion will be here in Dallas if the same type of thing happens or anything similar, because that’s the fire I have.”

The Stars, who have missed the playoffs the past five seasons, gave the 53-year-old Ruff a four-year contract. He is the 22nd coach in franchise history and seventh since the team moved to North Texas in 1993.

Before being fired by Buffalo in February, Ruff had been the Sabres coach for 15 seasons and was the NHL’s longest active-serving coach with one team.