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Civil rights icon Ruby Bridges meets Hoosier marshal who protected her

In this November 1960 photo, U.S. deputy marshals, including Charles Burks, top left, escort six-year-old Ruby Bridges from William Frantz Elementary School in New Orleans, La. The first grader was the only black child enrolled in the school, where parents of white students were boycotting the court-ordered integration law and were taking their children out of school. Bridges met with Burks on Thursday, at the Indianapolis Children's Museum in Indianapolis, where the two taped a video to share their experience with children. The museum has a recreation of the school and class room. (Associated Press file photo)
In this November 1960 photo, U.S. deputy marshals, including Charles Burks, top left, escort six-year-old Ruby Bridges from William Frantz Elementary School in New Orleans, La. The first grader was the only black child enrolled in the school, where parents of white students were boycotting the court-ordered integration law and were taking their children out of school. Bridges met with Burks on Thursday, at the Indianapolis Children's Museum in Indianapolis, where the two taped a video to share their experience with children. The museum has a recreation of the school and class room. (Associated Press file photo)
Copyright 2014 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.The Associated Press
Thursday, September 05, 2013 04:53 pm
INDIANAPOLIS — Civil rights icon Ruby Bridges is praising a now 91-year-old former federal marshal for escorting her more than a half-century ago to and from a previously all-white elementary school as she helped end segregation in New Orleans' public schools.Bridges met Thursday with Logansport resident Charles Burks, who was one of four federal marshals who escorted her as a 6-year-old past angry, racist crowds in 1960.

The pair had a private, filmed meeting at The Children's Museum of Indianapolis that will become part of its exhibit called "The Power of Children."

Burks told reporters afterward he was glad to do his duty by protecting Bridges.

Bridges says she didn't realize for years her important role in helping end segregation and thought at the time the crowds were in a parade.

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