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Bicentennial film brings a Fort Wayne take on Indiana history

<p>Courtesy photo</p><p>Indiana’s bicentennial year also was marked by the 100th running of the Indianapolis 500.</p>

Courtesy photo

Indiana’s bicentennial year also was marked by the 100th running of the Indianapolis 500.

<p>Courtesy photo</p><p>Norm Gable plays the role of a blacksmith at Old Fort Wayne in 1816.</p><p> </p>

Courtesy photo

Norm Gable plays the role of a blacksmith at Old Fort Wayne in 1816.

 

<p>Courtesy photo</p><p>Left to right, Gerald Pinkston, Jason Elkins, Kameron Joyner and Damon Gentry re-enact children's games of the 19th century at the Johnny Appleseed Festival.</p><p> </p><p> </p>

Courtesy photo

Left to right, Gerald Pinkston, Jason Elkins, Kameron Joyner and Damon Gentry re-enact children's games of the 19th century at the Johnny Appleseed Festival.

 

 

<p>Courtesy photo</p><p>Jonathan Schlegel portrays an early inhabitant of New Harmony, the small southwest Indiana town famous as an early 19th-century attempt at creating a utopian community.</p><p> </p>

Courtesy photo

Jonathan Schlegel portrays an early inhabitant of New Harmony, the small southwest Indiana town famous as an early 19th-century attempt at creating a utopian community.

 

<p>Courtesy photo</p><p>Luis Arroyo as a Native American begins his search for the missing Native American women who were kidnapped by the British at Fort Detroit.</p><p> </p>

Courtesy photo

Luis Arroyo as a Native American begins his search for the missing Native American women who were kidnapped by the British at Fort Detroit.

 

<p>Courtesy photo</p><p>San Youth Maw pays homage to the heyday of the Hoosier auto industry at the Auburn Cord Duesenberg Museum in Auburn.</p><p> </p>

Courtesy photo

San Youth Maw pays homage to the heyday of the Hoosier auto industry at the Auburn Cord Duesenberg Museum in Auburn.

 

More Information

Historic premiere

WHAT: “1816,” an Indiana Bicentennial film

WHERE: The History Center, 302 E. Berry St.

WHEN: 7 p.m. Friday and 3 p.m. Sunday

COST: Free

Copyright 2014 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.The Associated Press

Latest from Windsong Pictures aims to scan centuries of Hoosier stories.

Wednesday, December 14, 2016 09:01 pm

From early wars involving Native Americans to the Indianapolis 500, the latest film from Fort Wayne’s Windsong Pictures strives to scan the whole sweep of Hoosier history.“1816,” an official Indiana Bicentennial film, will premiere at 7 p.m. Friday at the History Center, 302 E. Berry St. It will play there again at 3 p.m. Sunday. Both performances will be free and open to the public. Executive Producer Michael Floyd emphasized that even when the film delves into terribly grim areas, such as the Civil War and the Holocaust, it avoids gore and remains, as he describes it, “family friendly.”

“Overall, we were looking for a theme that was positive, was filled with hope, with gratitude for those who went before us,” he said. “By no means do we paint the picture that we’re home free, that we have no problems, but we try to stay positive.”

In the 104-minute film, Floyd and the many who aided him – as actors, as producers, and in other roles – cover an enormous range. Beginning with Native Americans, through canals, railroads, windmills, the blossoming of the early automobile industry, Holocaust survivors who came to Indiana, the Great Depression to the Cold War and civil-rights campaigns, the movie covers tremendous historic territory. Floyd describes the film as incorporating a cast of thousands, including throngs of Civil War re-enactors and Indy 500 spectators.

 

    

More Information

More Information

Historic premiere

WHAT: “1816,” an Indiana Bicentennial film

WHERE: The History Center, 302 E. Berry St.

WHEN: 7 p.m. Friday and 3 p.m. Sunday

COST: Free

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