• Newsletters
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
°
Tuesday, May 23, 2017
View complete forecast
News-Sentinel.com Your Town. Your Voice.

Local filmmaker premieres river documentary Wednesday

Members of a local group who paddled in canoes from Fort Wayne to Toledo in April 2014 gaze out on the river during one of their stops along the 141-mile route. Local filmmaker Terry Doran followed them and used the trip as the basis for his new documentary, "Anne Frank and the River Traveler," which premieres locally Wednesday. (Courtesy of Stephanie Singer)
Members of a local group who paddled in canoes from Fort Wayne to Toledo in April 2014 gaze out on the river during one of their stops along the 141-mile route. Local filmmaker Terry Doran followed them and used the trip as the basis for his new documentary, "Anne Frank and the River Traveler," which premieres locally Wednesday. (Courtesy of Stephanie Singer)
This April 2014 photo shows members of the group organized by Save Maumee Grassroots Organization as paddle down Junk Ditch in Fort Wayne on the first day of their 141-mile journey down local streams and the Maumee River to Toledo. The trip forms the basis for Fort Wayne filmmaker Terry Doran's new documentary,
This April 2014 photo shows members of the group organized by Save Maumee Grassroots Organization as paddle down Junk Ditch in Fort Wayne on the first day of their 141-mile journey down local streams and the Maumee River to Toledo. The trip forms the basis for Fort Wayne filmmaker Terry Doran's new documentary, "Anne Frank and the River Traveler." (News-Sentinel file photo)
This is local filmmaker Terry Doran's favorite image from his new documentary,
This is local filmmaker Terry Doran's favorite image from his new documentary, "Anne Frank and the River Traveler," because it shows the contrast between the natural river and the trash that has been dumped into it. (Courtesy photo)

More Information

Film premiere

WHAT:
Local filmmaker Terry Doran will show his new, 30-minute documentary "Anne Frank and the River Traveler."

WHEN: Noon Wednesday

WHERE: Law School Courtroom, Indiana Tech, 1600 E. Washington Blvd.

COST: Free
Copyright 2014 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.The Associated Press
Monday, April 18, 2016 02:01 am
Fort Wayne filmmaker Terry Doran's favorite image in his new documentary is of two guys in a canoe, floating on the Maumee River. Rather than an idyllic scene of them communing with nature, they're staring down with a garbage can and two tires in the canoe between them — trash they pulled from the river or its banks. 

From its title to the stories told within it, Doran's 30-minute documentary "Anne Frank and the River Traveler" is a study in contrasts. The worst of human nature dumps trash and pollution in the river, Doran said. The best of human nature inspires people to try to save our streams.

"They are like Paul Revere, in a sense," he said of the river advocates who are the focus of his film. "You can't treat these rivers like toilets."

Doran will hold the film's premiere screening at noon Wednesday in the Law School Courtroom at Indiana Tech on East Washington Boulevard.

The film follows a group of people organized by the Save Maumee Grassroots Organization, who in April 2014 paddled in canoes on a nine-day, 141-mile voyage from southwest Fort Wayne to the Maumee River and down the Maumee to Lake Erie at Toledo.

Doran followed them on land, capturing the paddlers on the water and at their nightly stops to camp overnight. A support team in vehicles followed the river travelers to transport camping gear, food and other items to each night's overnight stop.

The film's title comes from one of the river travelers, who, during their overnight stop at Grand Rapids, Ohio, told Doran the story of his experience at a Catholic military boarding school on the edge of town.

He was sent there by his parents for his eighth-grade year in hopes the school would make him more enthusiastic about his Catholic faith, Doran said. The man said he hated it.

"The two things that inspired him to make it through: He read Anne Frank's diary. He was (age) 13, and she was 13 when she started writing her diary," Doran said. "And going down and looking over the Maumee River."

During the more than a week he spent with the travelers, Doran said he was inspired by their camaraderie and sense of community. He tried to capture that in his film.

He also was surprised by the amount of trash they found along their route. When Doran asked one young paddler his impressions of the trip at the end of the journey, the young man said, "An abundance of trash."

Doran said he biggest challenges in making the documentary included weaving the Anne Frank and river travelers' stories into one film and editing down hours and hours of video footage to what will hold people's interest. In addition to his own video, he also used footage shot by former News-Sentinel reporter/photographer Ellie Bogue, Erik Mollberg, Justinian Dispenza and Tim Zink.

Doran hopes people leave the film inspired.

"If these people can do it, ... I can do something," he said of the film's message. "I can make a difference."

He also hopes filmgoers face the fact that dirty and polluted water result from human nature.

"We are all susceptible to greed, corruption, turning the other way because it's easier to do that," he said. "You mess with water, you are messing with the survival of the race." 

More Information

Film premiere

WHAT:
Local filmmaker Terry Doran will show his new, 30-minute documentary "Anne Frank and the River Traveler."

WHEN: Noon Wednesday

WHERE: Law School Courtroom, Indiana Tech, 1600 E. Washington Blvd.

COST: Free

Comments

News-Sentinel.com reserves the right to remove any content appearing on its website. Our policy will be to remove postings that constitute profanity, obscenity, libel, spam, invasion of privacy, impersonation of another, or attacks on racial, ethnic or other groups. For more information, see our user rules page.
comments powered by Disqus