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Book review: 'The Platinum Age of Television'

<p>This cover image released by Penguin Random House/Doubleday shows, "The Platinum Age of Television: From I Love Lucy to The Walking Dead, How TV Became Terrific," by David Bianculli. (Penguin Random House/Doubleday via AP)</p>

This cover image released by Penguin Random House/Doubleday shows, "The Platinum Age of Television: From I Love Lucy to The Walking Dead, How TV Became Terrific," by David Bianculli. (Penguin Random House/Doubleday via AP)

Copyright 2014 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.The Associated Press
Thursday, December 08, 2016 04:00 am

“The Platinum Age of Television: From I Love Lucy to The Walking Dead, How TV Became Terrific” (Penguin Random House/ Doubleday), by David BianculliNPR’s “Fresh Air” TV critic David Bianculli has been a reviewer for over 40 years, and he’s crafted a wonderful overview of the history of television with “The Platinum Age of Television: From I Love Lucy to The Walking Dead, How TV Became Terrific.”

Bianculli loves the medium, and it shows. Rather than taking a year-by-year approach to showcase the best of television, he breaks it down by genre, including animation, Westerns, spy dramas, medical shows and crime.

He breaks down sitcoms into categories such as family and workplace comedies. Each section chronicles the history while also showcasing those shows that Bianculli considers groundbreakers that have established the genre. Among the shows he considers the best for the legal category: “Perry Mason,” ‘‘L.A. Law” and “Boston Legal.”

What makes this book so much more than an examination of the history of TV is the personal touch that Bianculli adds when he recounts why he fell in love with particular shows or how he was influenced by what he saw on the screen. He also interviews the creators behind the shows he considers the best of the best, and getting insight from legends such as Carl Reiner, Norman Lear and Steven Bochco truly captures why television continues to be the place where quality writing and imagination can reside.

The way we watch television might be changing, and there might be so many choices that nobody can watch everything.

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