BBB Tips: Watch out for emails from Dropbox

This list of scams is current as of September 30. Readers should take into consideration the importance of the practice in question and the total performance of the company. For complete information, please visit BBB.org

1. Spoofed email from Dropbox. Are you a Dropbox user or are you signing up for a new account? Be aware that you might be fooled into thinking that you did open an account. To verify its authenticity, hover over the hyperlink with your mouse. Does it show the actual web address for www.dropbox.com? If not discard the email right away.

2. Fake Apple receipts in your inbox. A woman reported having received two receipts in her inbox from Apple. One was in the amount of $103, and the other was for $29.99. She called her credit card company, which her iTunes account is connected to. There were no charges made to her account. This apparently is a new scam. Also, she went to Google to find a phone number for Apple to call and report the incident. The number she Googled did not go to Apple but to someone wanting to gain access to her personal computer. Beware of what number you use to call Apple. Information on the internet may be in error.

3. “You are under investigation by the fire department for tax fraud.” The call begins with “The IRS is accusing you of tax fraud and is demanding payment.” Then the caller says that the fire department is investigating you for tax fraud. Another line used is Homeland Security/(a name) and (a name) from the Fort Wayne Police Department is calling on behalf of the IRS. One individual was informed that they owed $1,950 for failure to pay taxes between the years of 2011 to 2016. If this money is not paid now and over the phone, you will be arreste.

4. FedEx name compromised in phishing scheme. When the URL link the frauds want you to open is hovered over and exposed, it does not belong to FedEx. Contact FedEx if you have concerns whether or not the email is legitimate.

5. “Do you still have interest in non-opioid pain medication?” Consumers have received a phone recording asking, “Do you still have interest in prescription benefits for non-opioid pain relief.” The calls are unsolicited. One person reported he was asked this question three times. After the third no, the caller hung up. At this time it is uncertain who this call is coming from or what their true motive is in making these calls. If you have any further information, please let us know.

6. Pattern of complaints from car giveaway contests. Have you received a mailer contest, where all you need to do is scratch off items and are an instant WINNER? BBB has received reports from disappointed winners who went to the dealership to claim their winnings only to be told that they had not actually won.

DO YOU HAVE A SCAM TO REPORT? Go to BBB.org to report. To date, 84,068 individuals have reported scams nationwide.

COMMENTS