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Sherman Boulevard at Goshen to close Thursday; Goshen remains open

The "five points" intersection is being transformed into a roundabout. (Courtesy image)
This detour is suggested while Sherman is closed. (Courtesy illustration)

Work on the roundabout portion of the Goshen Avenue improvement project begins this week and, to accommodate construction, Sherman Boulevard will close at Goshen beginning Thursday, Feb. 13, weather permitting.

A detour route will use St. Marys Avenue at West State Boulevard, crossing Goshen and to Russell Avenue, and connecting to Sherman on the north side of Goshen.

Goshen will remain open during construction, and a temporary traffic light and crosswalk will be in place at St. Marys, Russell and Goshen. The road closure is expected to last through mid-fall, weather permitting.

The Goshen Avenue project will improve safety for motorists and pedestrians and improve traffic flow in an area that is near popular attractions and often becomes heavily congested. The project stretching from State to Cambridge Avenue will improve traffic flow at the five-legged intersection of Goshen, Sherman Boulevard and Lillian Avenue. From Sherman to Cambridge, the addition of a center turn-lane will serve nearly 50 businesses along the corridor.

The improvement adds sidewalks, curbs and ADA ramps on both sides of the street, connecting pedestrians to neighborhoods and businesses. Other enhancements include decorative LED lighting throughout the project along with trees and shrubs and green infrastructure to control runoff, and an improved entrance and exit to Foellinger Theatre parking.

Work completed thus far includes sidewalk improvements of Goshen, from State to Sherman, and new curb and gutter, water main and sewer pipe installation west of Sherman.

Goshen Avenue has a long history that’s seen many changes over the years. In 1913, the road was known as the Lincoln Highway and was outside of the city limits. In the mid-20s, it became U.S. 33 until that route moved over to follow the Coliseum Boulevard bypass. Today, it’s an urban street with city neighborhoods, nearby schools, churches, and a business corridor.

More than 18,500 vehicles enter the five-legged intersection each day.